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Research in physical medicine and rheumatology

In addition to the broad clinical activity, research is an important part in the department of physical medicine and rheumatology. Basic research is carried out in the University department of rheumatology in cooperation with our colleagues from the department of rheumatology at the Zurich University Hospital.

With a view to developing new therapeutic strategies, we are identifying epigenetic modifications in selected rheumatological diseases. For this purpose, we are establishing a biobank of various tissue specimens and using novel molecular techniques to analyse them for pathogenetically relevant signalling pathways.

Research focus

Our clinical research focuses are as follows:

  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)
  • Changes in vertebral bone marrow lesions (Modic Changes)
  • Studying the effectiveness of cortisone, hyaluronic acid, and autologous blood used in the treatment of early arthritis in the knee

Contact

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Assistant professor Dr. Astrid Jüngel
Head of Research Rheumatology

Phone: +41 44 510 75 13
EMail

Specialty training in physical medicine and rheumatology

We offer doctors accredited specialty training in physical medicine and rehabilitation (category A) and rheumatology (category B). Here at the University Department of Rheumatology we have a closely linked training network with the Department of Rheumatology at the Zurich University Hospital. This allows specialty trainees to obtain all the relevant training at the two facilities.

Learn more

Modic changes in low back pain

The ‘Global Burden of Disease Study’ identified low back pain (LBP) as the world’s most common disabling condition. Vertebral bone marrow lesions adjacent to degenerated discs – called Modic changes – coincide with LBP. Modic changes are highly prevalent in patients with LBP but still a poorly understood degenerative disorder of the spine. As a result, patients suffering from Modic changes often do not receive adequate treatment.

The main reasons are as follows:

  • Modic changes are often not identified in primary care due to the lack of diagnostic tools
  • There is no targeted treatment available for painful Modic changes


Research aims

Our aims are to develop biomarkers and treatment strategies to eliminate painful Modic changes. We will achieve our goal by understanding of the interaction between intervertebral disc degeneration and the bone marrow, in particular bone marrow stem cells.

We are addressing this problem with deep characterisation of human surgical samples and evaluating their behaviour in in-vitro studies, using state-of-the-art molecular assays and cutting-edge technologies such as multiphoton excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPE-FLIM) and high-dimensional fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).



Stefan Dudli, PhD
Group Head

Phone: +41 44 510 75 23
EMail